Tips for Fun in the Sun and Water

This summer, make sure to keep your family safe by following some tips recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

The best way to protect yourself and your children from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is to cover up. It is best to limit exposure during hours of intense sun, which are between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 to protect against UVA and UVB rays on both sunny and cloudy days. Reapply sunscreen every two hours or after sweating or any activity in the water, such as swimming.

To prevent heat stress in exercising, children should choose light-colored and lightweight clothing. Dress in one layer of absorbent material to help with the evaporation of sweat. Ensure that your children take a break to drink every 20 minutes while active in the heat.

The best way to prevent drowning in children is to closely supervise your children while near water. Avoid inflatable swimming aids, such as “floaties,” as they can give a false sense of security. Instead, use approved life vests if your children need help in the waters.

Related Articles:

http://www.cmc-pa.com/school-age/water-safety-pool/
http://www.cmc-pa.com/2014/06/vacation-2/
http://www.cmc-pa.com/school-age/how-to-choose-the-right-sunscreen/
http://www.cmc-pa.com/school-age/is-it-too-hot-for-my-child-to-play-outside/
http://www.cmc-pa.com/school-age/how-to-treat-sunburn/
http://www.cmc-pa.com/school-age/water-safety-for-children/

For more tips on sun and water safety, visit healthychildren.org.

Pediatricians Play a Role in Children’s Oral Health

In a revised statement, “Maintaining and Improving the Oral Health of Young Children,” which is featured in the December 2014 issue of Pediatrics, the AAP notes that pediatricians play an important role in improving oral health for young children. Younger children often see a pediatrician more frequently than a dentist, putting pediatricians in a unique position to provide oral health counseling. 

– See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/Pediatricians-Play-a-Role-in-Children’s-Oral-Health.aspx

AAP Recommends Flu Vaccine for All Children Six Months and Older

A recent report by the AAP proposes that children ages six months and older should be immunized against influenza once the vaccination is available. The report, published September 22, 2014, states that although the vaccine strains have not changed since last season, another dose of the vaccine is essential.

To learn more about this news, read the American Academy of Pediatrics article here.

AAP Recommends Fluoride to Prevent Tooth Decay

A recent report by the AAP suggests that fluoride is effective in cavity prevention in children. According to the report published on August 25, 2014, the AAP recommends fluoridated toothpaste in appropriate amounts for children, under the supervision of an adult. For example, a grain of rice sized dab of toothpaste should be used up to the age of three once teeth have erupted and after age three a pea-sized amount is recommended. The AAP also cautions against over-the-counter fluoridated products for children younger than 6 as there is a risk of swallowing high levels of fluoride.

To learn more about this news, read the American Academy of Pediatrics article here:

http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Recommends-Fluoride-to-Prevent-Dental-Caries.aspx