Why Does My Teen Get Acne?

Acne is a problem that many Americans face, approximately 17 million people in the U.S. have acne, so your teen is not the only one. So, why do all these people have acne and where does it come from? Contrary to popular belief, acne is not caused by having dirty skin. Acne is caused by an inflammation of pores due to overactive oil glands and a build-up of oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria. People between the ages of 12 and 24 are more likely to get acne because oil glands become stimulated when hormones become active during puberty. However, having acne can also be genetic, so if people in your family have acne, your teen may be more prone to having acne too.

Even though it is hard to fight genetics, there are ways to help reduce the amount of acne your teen may get!

•Make sure your teen washes their face. Washing your face is extremely important because it helps remove excess oils and dead skin that can clog pores and cause pimples. But be careful, washing the face too much can be harmful by overdrying and irritating existing acne.
•If your teen works out or tends to get pretty sweaty, have them wash their face as soon after sweating as possible, because sweat can clog pores and make acne a lot worse.
•Speaking of clogging pores, it is important to use lotions and makeup that are noncomedogenic or nonacnegenic, which means that the product won’t clog your pores.

Pediatricians Play a Role in Children’s Oral Health

In a revised statement, “Maintaining and Improving the Oral Health of Young Children,” which is featured in the December 2014 issue of Pediatrics, the AAP notes that pediatricians play an important role in improving oral health for young children. Younger children often see a pediatrician more frequently than a dentist, putting pediatricians in a unique position to provide oral health counseling. 

– See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/Pediatricians-Play-a-Role-in-Children’s-Oral-Health.aspx

AAP Recommends Fluoride to Prevent Tooth Decay

A recent report by the AAP suggests that fluoride is effective in cavity prevention in children. According to the report published on August 25, 2014, the AAP recommends fluoridated toothpaste in appropriate amounts for children, under the supervision of an adult. For example, a grain of rice sized dab of toothpaste should be used up to the age of three once teeth have erupted and after age three a pea-sized amount is recommended. The AAP also cautions against over-the-counter fluoridated products for children younger than 6 as there is a risk of swallowing high levels of fluoride.

To learn more about this news, read the American Academy of Pediatrics article here:

http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Recommends-Fluoride-to-Prevent-Dental-Caries.aspx