Is Snacking Good?

Good news, snacking is good for you….as long as they are healthy snacks! During adolescence, the body needs more nutrients to grow which is why teenagers feel hungry a lot throughout the day. This is why snacks are a great way to satisfy that hunger and give the body the nutrients it needs to grow. Although it may be tempting for every teen to have a soda and candy bar after school, the temporary sugar boost it gives will slow them down in the long run. In order to keep energy levels going and to avoid weight gain, choose snacks that are full of fiber and protein such as peanut butter, fruits, or yogurts. However, you have to beware of claims that snack manufacturers make on their products. Just because something is “all natural” or “pure” does not mean that it is nutritious, such as fruit juices which can be filled with sugar which makes it extremely high in calories. Similarly, watch out for snacks with “low-fat” claims, because usually the fat is replaced with large amounts of sugar which is just as unhealthy. In order to judge how healthy a product is for you, look at the nutrition information on the food label.

The Difference Between Sadness and Depression

If you have suspicions that your teen may be depressed, this article may help you determine whether it is depression or just sadness. Feeling sad, down, or disheartened are natural human emotions and reactions to the hardships of life, but depression is different. Depression is a strong mood involving sadness, discouragement, despair, or hopelessness that lasts for weeks, months, or even longer. Depression drains the motivation, energy, and concentration of the person it affects, and it can even cause aches and pains in the body. One sign that your child may be depressed is that they are pulling away from friends, family, or activities that they once enjoyed, which will ultimately make them feel more lonely. People with depression may also feel tired and exhausted and it may take them longer to do everyday activities. And depression also has physical symptoms, such as a loss of appetite or weight gain or loss. If you believe your teen may be depressed, schedule a consultation with your pediatrician to discuss your concerns.